Where does the Monon Trail start Indianapolis?

The Monon Trail starts in Hamilton County, Indiana at the 96th Street trailhead in Carmel and stretches more than 25 miles north through Westfield and Grand Park to the town of Sheridan.

How long is the Monon Trail in Indianapolis?

About the Monon Trail It now spans more than 25 miles in length, starting in the town of Sheridan and connecting south through Westfield and Carmel. From there, the Monon Trail continues into Indianapolis through the Broad Ripple neighborhood and meets up with the Cultural Trail near Massachusetts Avenue downtown.

Is the Monon Trail lit?

The trail isn’t lit and much of it is shrouded under trees and vegetation, which make it pitch black in places.

How long is the Monon Greenway?

The Monon Greenway runs from 96th Street to Westfield, IN. Formerly the Monon Railroad, this popular trail serves walkers, joggers, runners, bicyclists, rollerbladers and nature enthusiasts. Carmel maintains the 5.2 mile portion that resides within its borders. The Monon Greenway is a “rails to trails” project.

Is the Monon Trail Safe?

“The Monon Trail is safe. Last month, IMPD held a meeting to emphasize safety along the Monon. The department does use bike patrols on the trail during daylight hours. Still, police never recommend people use the trail alone at dark, as the victim did in this case.

Who owns the Monon Trail?

The railroad adopted the train’s popular nickname, the Monon, as its official name in the 1950s. The Louisville & Nashville Railroad acquired the railroad in 1971, but by 1987 parts of the line were no longer used, including a section that launched the Monon Trail in 1999.

How much of the Nickel Plate Trail is paved?

The Nickel Plate Trail has 37 miles of paved trail from Kokomo in Howard County to Rochester in Fulton County.

Where does Nickel Plate Trail start?

The Nickel Plate Trail is the 40+mile railtrail corridor running from Kokomo in Howard County to Rochester in Fulton County.

How did Monon Trail get its name?

The Monon Trail gets its name from the Potawatomi word “monong,” meaning “swift running.” Today, people take to the trail at a variety of paces.

What happened to the Nickel Plate Railroad?

The Nickel Plate fell into receivership in 1885 and was reorganized as the New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad Co. The New York Central’s ownership of the Nickel Plate gave it a monopoly on the east-west rail traffic between Buffalo and Chicago.

Who bought the Wabash railroad?

MetroLink
After passenger service was discontinued, trains on this stretch were reduced to one westbound symbol freight and one local per day. Norfolk Southern, who took over the line after the merger, abandoned the stretch in 1988. The Bi-State Development Agency purchased the line, which is now operated by MetroLink.

Where is the Monon Trail in Indianapolis?

Running from 10th Street through the northside of Indianapolis, Broad Ripple, Nora, and continuing through Carmel, Westfield, Hamilton County, and Sheridan – each with its own government and control over the Monon. The Monon Trail gives walkers, runners, cyclists, and exercise enthusiasts of all types a peaceful, well groomed path.

Where does the Monon rail trail start and end?

The popular Monon Rail Trail stretches from the town of Sheridan in the north, extends south through Westfield, Carmel, Broad Ripple, and passes by the Indiana State Fairgrounds before intersecting with the Indianapolis Cultural Trail on the east end of Massachusetts Avenue (Mass Ave).

Is the Monon community center open to the public?

The MCC is open to both Carmel and non-Carmel residents. Individual Youth, Adult and Senior memberships are available for purchase online. Day passes + *household memberships can be purchased in-person at the Monon Community Center. *Household passes available for purchase in-person only.

What does the X in Monon Indiana mean?

The lines formed a large “X” across the state of Indiana and crossed each other in Monon Indiana. The town of Monon was on the Monong River which meant “Swift Running” in the language of the Potowatomi. The Monon discontinued passenger service to Indianapolis in 1959.